Favorite font?

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500+ is a small collection when it comes to fonts; mine's got a couple more 0's on the end. And you'll never get down to 50-100 installed total without breaking your PC, because Windows has more than that by default.

There are many questions that go into determining what you need in a good personal collection. Most of them are about defining your style, because that will affect how many you need... do you lean more toward wanting handwritten-looking journaling or traditional text fonts? What do you like for page titles and word art? Romantic pages will lean towards more script fonts, kid-oriented pages might mean adding more playful fonts; everyday life might call for a script/sans/serif font trio if you're more of a minimalist or want unified font choices throughout albums, or a well-chosen small collection like you already have if you prefer more variety in your pages.

Simplifying a collection? The easiest way is to choose a few primary font families that all work well together. Ideally, you'd have one sans serif in a variety of weights, with italic and small-cap variants as well. Then choose a serif font family that goes well with it--again, with multiple weights, italics, and small caps. A couple of display fonts and script fonts that work with both of your main sans and serif families will give you a relatively minimalist collection that will work for most things.

That, however, doesn't work for me: I like to have all the pretties and am perfectly happy with different fonts on every pair of facing pages!

I usually like to pick a font that matches the theme. For instance, Poker Kings is a favorite for Western style pages. I'll use it for the titles and complement the journal cards or captions in a simple san-serif typeface. On my annual books, I try not too repeat fonts, so I make good use of most of the fonts in my library.

Holly, that's why I took the (painstaking) time to go through and tag my fonts, and make sure to use NexusFont's ability to do collections and compare fonts and such. I like having lots of options (that's the designer in me, I guess), but I do also like having some consistency through a kit or other project as needed. I've got basic tags like "script," "hand," "sans," "serif," "body," etc. so I can find the ones that work for go-to uses, and then for any given project I make a collection and dump the fonts I'm using for it in there so I can refer to them quickly.

Yep, Amanda, I work the same way. Still going through that (huge) painstaking tagging process as I recover from a major uninstall overreach that ATE my A through H folders with no way to restore them (using ALL the data recovery tools I have), and discovered some sectors on my backup drive had also gone bad--luckily, one of my exes had an offsite backup from when we were dating that restored the older half of them and I'm able to re-download the ones I've purchased since then without an issue. That just leaves going through FontSquirrel and the Open Font Library once I finish with the purchases. Still a project and a half that'll take months to complete, but it'll be worth it in the end.

On the plus side, I know for a fact that everything currently in those A through H folders is accurately tagged with creating foundry, site I got it from, and license terms, even if they're still somewhat smaller...and my PU fonts are in a separate set of folders now, too. I'll definitely be having my ex hold a fresh backup with the way it's saved my butt here; updating that copy will likely be a monthly task done at the same time as website backups.

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