Licensing (TOU)

At Pixel Scrapper we have two licenses: Personal Use, and Commercial Use. We rebel against the tradition of making people feel like criminals for wanting to download and build upon our creations, and these licenses are intended to be as simple and freeing as we can make them (read our manifesto to learn more about our philosophy).

Personal Use License

This license is intended for personal use, or for any use that does not generate income, and is not attached to your profession.

Please Do:

  • Use the item however you want for personal use!
  • Use the item for any non-profit, non-professional purpose (flyers, yearbooks, non-profit posters, etc.).
  • Adapt and remix the item, then post or give away the resulting adaptations for non-commercial use (as long as you do so for free, and you are not a professional designer).
  • Attribution is not required.

Please Do Not:

  • Use the item for commercial purposes (anything where you make money, or attached to your profession).
  • Distribute the item "as is" directly to others (refer them to the item's page instead).
  • Upload any derivative works to a stock image website.

Derivative Works Licensing:

  • Derivative works must be distributed for free, and under any non-commercial use license of your choice.

Commercial Use license

This license covers any commercial or professional use of an item, or any use which generates income or profit. Professional designers should use this license for anything they distribute, including freebies.

Please Do:

  • Use the item in commercial layouts, designs, etc.
  • Adapt and remix the item, then sell or give away the resulting adaptations.
  • Use the item on physical products like mugs, shirts, etc. which you sell.
  • Attribution is not required (though always appreciated).

Please Do Not:

  • Resell or distribute the digital file "as is" without first getting permission from the item's designer.
  • Upload any derivative works to a stock image website.

Derivative Works Licensing:

  • Derivative works may be distributed under any license that you choose.

Commercial Use FAQs

What are the basics of how I can use commercial use items that I download from Pixel Scrapper?

If you are distributing a digital file directly to other people (for example, as an item in your own digital scrapbooking kit, or as a freebie on your website), you will generally need to modify or remix the item before you distribute it.

As long as you modify/remix an item, you may distribute it as you like (for example, in your own kits, as a freebie on your website), under any license you choose (cu for cu is okay), with one exception: no uploading to stock image websites (see below).

If you are not distributing a digital file directly to other people, you may generally use it as you like, without restriction--no need to modify or remix the design (so go ahead and make printed papers, clothing, accessories, etc. to sell as you like).

As a rule, we are quite tolerant when it comes to people using our designs, and distributing their derivative works. We realize that licensing can be tricky, and we're on your side. We always give people the benefit of the doubt, we're happy to talk things out, and we won't come after you in a nasty way unless you are intentionally and blatantly abusing our work in a malicious way. So take a breath, and rest easy (read our manifesto to learn more about our philosophy).

Read the FAQs below for more specifics.

What counts as modifying/remixing an item?

That's a tricky question. Before we address specifics, you need to understand the point of the "remix" rule: at Pixel Scrapper we want you to be able to use our designs to springboard your own creativity, without having to worry that you'll get in trouble for distributing the cool derivatives that you come up with. We believe that creation builds on creation, and we want you to have the full freedom to take our designs, mix and match, build, layer, flatten, enhance, color, change--and then distribute and sell the creative "remixes" you come up with (see our manifesto).

But what if someone were to download everything on Pixel Scrapper, throw the stuff together into a few "kits", and then sell those "kits" on their own website, without making any changes to the files? That would clearly be an abuse of the system, and that's why we say that you need to modify and remix our designs before you distribute them: the goal is to springboard the creativity of other people, not allow people to steal our work and sell it as their own.

Here are some examples of great remixing:

  • Using one of our templates combined with your own work to create a unique design, paper, or embellishment.
  • Combining our templates or assets to create your own designs (using a heart brad together with a ribbon template that you color to create a unique ribbon with a repeating heart pattern, for example).
  • Taking a layered psd template, moving the layers around, recoloring some layers, flattening some layers, and adding some of your own layers.

Here are some examples of less creative, but generally acceptable remixing:

  • Recoloring a template or asset, as long as the colors are fairly different from the original.
  • Taking a layered psd template, recoloring some layers, and flattening the image.
  • These techniques are generally okay as long as you are also distributing some more original work--but don't distribute a kit that has nothing but recolored assets in it, for example.

Here are some examples that would generally not count as remixing:

  • Taking a red heart illustration, and changing it to be a slightly darker shade of red -- not enough of a change.
  • Taking a layered psd template, and nudging the layers around a little bit, without any other modifications -- not enough of a change.

What counts as a "remix", in the end, is always going to be subjective. One rule of thumb is to imagine asking (or actually ask!) a few random people if they think the file you've edited is essentially the same as the original, or a "remix." If most of them would say "remix," then you are probably good to go.

At the end of the day what you should keep in mind is the intention of the rule, and your intention as a designer: if your goal is to make some quick money by passing other peoples' work off as your own, and you want to know the least you can do to get away with it, then you're not abiding by our remix philosophy, no matter what you do. If, on the other hand, you're like most designers, and are interested in using our designs to springboard your own creative work, then you can rest easy: don't sweat a particular edge case here or there ("oh no, I'm not sure if recoloring this one item is enough of a modification in this particular situation--will I get in trouble?" The answer is almost always going to be "no").

May I use your items to decorate mugs/clothing/accessories/etc that I sell in my Etsy store?

Yes. You can always use our designs on physical goods that you sell, regardless of whether or not you change the design (for example, you could take this heart bottle cap, put it on a mug, and sell it directly, without modifying the image at all). If you don't change the design at all the original designer retains full copyright, but you are given full permission to use that design.

May I use your items in online or print advertising, website design, magazines, billboards, etc.?

Yes. As with physical goods, as long as you are not distributing the digital file directly to other people, you can generally use it as you like, without modifying the design at all.

If you are distributing a digital file directly to other people (for example, as an item in your own digital scrapbooking kit), you will need to modify or remix the item before you distribute it.

May I use one or more of your templates to make my own digital designs which I then sell/distribute? (For example, using this ribbon template together with this heart button template and coloring them to make my own "heart ribbon").

Yes. As long as you are "remixing" the items that you download, you are free to sell/distribute the resulting adaptations in your own kits, or as freebies/downloads from your own website. The only restriction is that you do not distribute the resulting design via a stock image website.

May I combine some of your assets together to make my own digital designs which I then sell/distribute? (For example, using this flower embellishment and some other items, and repeating them over a textured background to make my own paper?)

Yes. As with templates, you can use assets to create your own designs which you then sell/distribute, as long as you are remixing and adapting the images. With assets, you need to be a bit more careful to make sure that you are making something that is uniquely your own. The only restriction is that you do not distribute the resulting design via a stock image website.

Does recoloring an item count as modifying/remixing it?

Generally, yes. You may recolor templates and then include them in kits that you sell/distribute, or as freebies/downloads from your own website (for example, color in this shoe illustration, and then put it in your kit).

You may also recolor assets and then distribute them in the same way, but you need to make sure that you change the color significantly. For example, taking this red felt heart, and making it a slightly deeper shade of red would not count as modifying it. Making it blue, on the other hand, would count as modifying it.

Recoloring is an example of a technique that is generally okay as long as you are also distributing some more original work--but don’t distribute a kit that has nothing but recolored assets in it, for example.

As usual, you may not distribute the recolored items via a stock image website.

Does flattening a layered PSD template count as modifying/remixing it? (For example, can I flatten this floral paper template, and then distribute the flattened image?)

Generally, no: in addition to flattening a layered PSD template you will need to do some coloring, and/or other modifications in order for the resulting item to be considered a "remix."

May I sell/distribute your layered templates as layered PSD files, as long as I modify them?

Generally, yes, but be cautious: the file you distribute should be significantly different from the original template. Moving the layers slightly is not considered a "remix" (unless you were to flatten the file and distribute it as a jpg): you would need to do things like coloring some layers, moving and flattening some layers, and/or adding additional layers.

Imagine asking a few random people if they think the file you've edited is essentially the same as the original, or a "remix." If most of them would say "remix," then you are probably good to go.

May I take a bunch of your assets/templates without modifying them, and put them in a digital kit which I then sell/distribute?

Generally, no. You need to modify/remix the items that you download before you can distribute them directly to others as digital files. Exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis: you can contact the item's designer to ask about your particular use case.

May I remix some of your items, and then upload the resulting images to a stock image website?

No. This is our one distribution restriction: nothing you make using our images may be uploaded to any stock image website. Examples of stock image websites include:

If you are not sure if a particular site counts as a stock image website, please contact us.

I purchased a download subscription, then canceled it: can I still use all the items I downloaded for commercial use?

Yes. The items you download from Pixel Scrapper are yours to keep and use under the license that you chose, even if your subscription is canceled, or expires.

Do I need to give credit to the original designer?

Giving credit back to the original designer is not required, but always appreciated.

What license can I distribute derivative works (modified items) under?

As long as you have downloaded the item for commercial use, and have abided by our terms, you are free to distribute your derivative under any license that you choose. "CU for CU" is fine, as is any other license.